Harvard Macy Community Blog

Fostering the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.

Connecting our Community - A Social Media Update from the Harvard Macy Institute

In 2015, the Harvard Macy Institute made the decision to ‘go social’ to connect our worldwide community via Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook, under the leadership of inaugural social media strategist Holly Gooding. We started our community blog, with the mission to “foster the ongoing connectedness of health professions educators committed to transforming health care delivery and education.” Our efforts were intended to bring our alumni up to date news in health professions education, to promote the inquiry and scholarship that the Harvard Macy Institute values, and to celebrate the global and diverse Harvard Macy Institute community of practice.

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Reflecting Upon My Harvard Macy Journey

In this post, I will share a brief story of my journey since I first joined the Harvard Macy Institute community in 2015. I have heard from other faculty that it can take a few years after attending a Harvard Macy Institute course to establish real change at our local institutions. Certainly, this was true for me, as I embarked upon the challenge to develop a new nursing department at Swinburne University in Melbourne, Australia. There is no doubt that this was not for the faint hearted, as starting a new department in nursing education at a University with no history of healthcare professions education was a real challenge! We are now at the end of our first year of our undergraduate nursing program with plans to move into the postgraduate space within the next three years! So far, all signs indicate that this has been a very successful process as our students and industry partners have provided us with really positive evaluations. I believe there have been a number of ‘secrets to our successes’, and I will spotlight three significant ones in this post:

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Interactive Video Blog Series: Worldwide Innovations in Healthcare Delivery

Interactive Video Blog Series: Worldwide Innovations
in Healthcare Delivery

​ In this video, Drs. Tom Aretz and Michael Wilkes discuss worldwide innovations in healthcare delivery, including an increased emphasis on quality management and continuous professional development. They discuss such vexing questions as: How can we combat the human resource challenges in healthcare worldwide for both systems-based and community care? What are some opportunities for and barriers to offering integrated interprofessional care? How can we work together to ensure that trainees who will be taking care of patients in community and outpatient settings have the skills needed when they train at tertiary care institutions? And perhaps most importantly, what leadership will be required to ensure these efforts are impactful on a global scale?

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Question Bursts: An Innovative Strategy to Address the Wicked Problem of Gender Inequity within Academic Medicine

This #MedEdPearls highlights the problem solving workshop facilitated by Linda Love, Gary Beck Dallaghan, Carrie Bowler, Shanu Gupta, Larry Hurtubise, Kari Simonsen, Jessica Snowden, and David Way at The Generalists in Medical Education - #TGME18.

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Interactive Video Blog Series: Support Students and Faculty through Application of Learning Sciences

How can we apply the wealth of research from the cognitive sciences to improve teaching and learning? In these 3 short videos, Dr. Holly Gooding interviews Dr. Jennifer Meka, Director of the Woodward Center for Excellence in Health Sciences Education and Cognitive Skills Programs at Penn State College of Medicine Director, to find answers to this key question. They review spaced education, retrieval practice, time management skills, metacognition, and more in this series of video blogs.

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Building the Emergency Department...from scratch!

The project I brought to the Harvard Macy Institute Leading Innovations in Healthcare and Education course was to create a model emergency service in Kuwait from what had historically been a clinic run by internists. This emergency service will include an “ideal” emergency department (ED). I had to take a step back and analyze what that means to me - and more importantly - my patients.

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Blockchain Mania

Have you recently found yourself wondering “What is Blockchain? And why do I keep hearing about it?” If you answered yes, then this blog is for you! To begin, Blockchain is not the answer to everything. It also isn’t miraculously a savior for the problems we have in healthcare. Also, there is no universal definition for it. What it is though, in relation to health, would primarily be in advancing securityand trust in data.

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Assessing Clinical Reasoning: Identifying the GAP

At the end of a case presentation, you ask your learner “what’s the patient diagnosis?”, and you think to yourself “what’s the learner diagnosis?” 

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Once a scholar, forever a scholar

Blog authors: Aida Darweish and Nouf (Nova) Al-Rumaihi

Attending Harvard Macy Institute courses brings a unique kind of excitement to those who attend, and this is a sentiment expressed by many faculty and scholars. As a scholar, the most striking part of Harvard Macy courses is creating a psychologically safe, positive learning environment. This optimizes learners’ interactions and has a tremendous effect on immediate and later outcomes of the learning process. In a safe learning environment, all learners can share their experiences and express their opinions without embarrassment at any point. The other thing that is unique about HMI courses is creating a community of practice where we are connected forever, where we receive advice and share thoughts from long life colleagues and friends from all over the world. They are always ready to help and collaborate on medical education projects.

Last summer, we attended the Harvard Macy Institute Leading Innovations in Health Care and Education course in Boston. As a result, we were asked by Margaret Hay (Educators ‘10, Assessment ‘10, Leaders ‘11) to serve as course faculty for the “Leadership and Innovation in Healthcare” course at the Monash Institute for Health and Clinical Education (MIHCE, Monash University, Australia). This course is a unique collaboration between the MICHE and the Harvard Macy Institute (Boston, USA), and was held in the United Arab Emirates in November 2017. We were amazed to meet so many dedicated educators and innovators from around the world including Australia, New Zealand, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United States, and United Arab Emirates. Indeed, we were no longer scholars, but now valuable members of the core faculty team!

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Is What You Know Wrong? The Cost of Knowledge Growth and Decay

“But what do I really need to know!?” asks the concerned student. Being the sage health professions educator you are, you respond with a turning of the table. “What would your patient would want you to know?”

Although seemingly glib, this axiom has helped guide the depth and breadth of curricula for decades. Health professions education has traditionally been defined largely by a student’s ability to compile and recall the voluminous amounts of knowledge necessary for the safe and effective practice of their discipline. What does this mean in the context of competency-based education? What happens when what was once true is now false?

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#MedEdPearls October 2018 - Microaggressions

Microaggressions are “brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative . . . slights and insults” (Sue et al., 2007).

Microaggressions can have a macro affect, particularly when considering the cumulative burden for individuals and organizations over time. Microaggressions show up everywhere in society including in our classrooms, clinics, hallways, on social media, in our neighborhood watch app, and at the grocery store!

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Embracing Technology to Maximize Your Academic Productivity

As clinician educators, our time is increasingly limited. Often, we must balance competing roles as clinicians, teachers, and program administrators. On top of that, we are expected to produce scholarship as part of our institution’s academic mission and for career advancement. However, the increasing availability of technology provides new opportunities for scholarly output and dissemination. This post will highlight three strategies for using technology to maximize your scholarly output.

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Deploy team science principles to mend “silos” in academic medicine

Though it is difficult to predict the future, it is safe to say that collaborative, cross-disciplinary approaches to complex societal problems are here to stay. This is evidenced by team science, a collaborative and cross-disciplinary approach that has accomplished biomedical breakthroughs once considered impossible. Making the most of the opportunities that team science has to offer may seem fraught with the challenges of adapting from a solo-investigator culture to one of collaboration; however, new advances become possible through this methodology.

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Dear Native English Speakers, Please Make Sure Your English is Understandable

What do the AMEE Conference, Reddit, and popular programming languages - such as Java - have in common? If you answer that they are all based on English, you are correct. Though they are international, their medium of choice, like many other things, is English. The landscape of academia is also English-based, as English publications are far more numerous that those of other languages.

Therefore, native English speakers may naturally feel more at ease communicating with an international audience. However, this BBC article describes why non-native speakers can be more effectual English communicators in these settings, and native speakers should step up their game.

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#HMIchat September 2018 - How Do We Use and Foster Curiosity and Creativity as Educators?

I arrived home from Basel energized and inspired by AMEE 2018. The conference’s fringe sessions were the inspiration for this month’s chat, which aimed to answer the question, “How to use and foster curiosity and creativity as educators?

Many students enter medical school with open minds and a thirst for knowledge. Unfortunately, that insatiable curiosity can fade somewhere along the path of medical school and residency. This brings to mind a few questions. First, what factors in our own training programs can lead to that loss of curiosity? And secondly, and maybe more importantly, is it possible to relight that flame, or to guard against it ever going out? I personally love the idea of arts and humanities courses for medical students. Atipong Pathanasethpong (@atipongpath) told us about Khon Kaen University’s art classes for first year medical students. Such an innovative idea!

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Challenging Assumptions: Your own, your tribe’s, and your community’s

The Harvard Macy Institute Program for Educators in Health Professions is an ideal place to develop and practice new teaching skills consistent with the current knowledge of experiential learning theory, as well as a place to enhance scholarly expertise and explore organizational leadership. As I found, it is also a place to recognize your personal potential and to help others find theirs by identifying ideas, commitments, and even biases, that knowingly or unknowingly hold us back. Ultimately, this allows us to transform into better versions of our educator and leader selves.

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Behind the Curtain with Louis Pangaro: How the RIME Framework was born

Recently, Louis Pangaro received the 2018 National Board of Medical Examiners Hubbard award. Lou is known for his work developing conceptual frameworks for assessment and developed the RIME framework for clinical assessment of learners in medical education. As Lou is one of the course directors for our ‘Systems Approach to Assessment in Health Professions Education’ course, and a leader in medical education assessment of learners, we thought we’d ask him to explain the RIME Framework, and how it came to be.

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#MedEdPearls September 2018 - A different approach to questioning

Looking for a quick, engaging activity for your course? Try a slightly different approach to using questions that facilitates peer instruction, promotes deeper learning, and allows for knowledge application. Similar to Team-based Learning, this activity can also give student teams an opportunity to provide rationale for their responses while also providing you feedback on how well students are understanding the material.

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The Role of Formal Training in Medical Education: New Pathways to Medical Education

Since my early years in medical school I have understood that teaching was one of the skills a physician should have. Teaching patients, families, and multi-disciplinary teams is a daily and complex activity. What shall we say then about teaching prospective doctors? Is it a higher calling, an inherent talent impossible to be taught and learned? Or is it a teachable skill itself?

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Disrupting Health Professions Education…What we learned from this month’s #HMIChat

We had a lively discussion during this month’s #HMIChat about disruptive innovation focused on health professions education. We discussed many sustaining innovations as well, and highlighted the difference between the two. For those interested in reading more check out the pre-reading for the chat. Obviously, the @HarvardMacy and #MedEd community at large is eager to innovate, whether it be sustaining or disruptive and quite frankly we need both types!

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