Privacy Statement for
Harvard Macy Institute Website

The following discloses our information gathering and dissemination practices for the Harvard Macy Institute Homepage (www.harvardmacy.org)

I N F O R M A T I O N   G A T H E R I N G

We use your IP address to help diagnose problems with our server and to administer our Web site by identifying which parts of our site are most heavily used. We do not link IP addresses to anything personally identifiable. This means that user sessions will be tracked, but the users will remain anonymous.

Our staff occasionally monitors search terms that users enter into the Harvard Macy Institute Search Engine but this tracking is never associated with individual users.

U S E   O F   I N F O R M A T I O N

The Harvard Macy Institute Homepage staff uses the information gathered above to tailor site content to user needs, and to generate aggregate statistical reports. At no time do we disclose site usage by individual IP addresses. Web server logs are retained on a temporary basis and then deleted completely from our systems.

S E C U R I T Y

This site has security measures in place to protect the loss, misuse and alteration of the information under our control.

C O N T A C T I N G   T H E   H A R V A R D  M A C Y  I N S T I T U T E

If you have any questions about this privacy statement, the practices of this site, or your dealings with this site, you can contact

Harvard Macy Institute
131 Dartmouth Street
Fifth Floor
Boston MA 02116

Search

Find information fast using our powerful search engine.

Subscribe

Sign Up for HMI News

Calendar

Come join us at our next event. View our Event Calendar to see what's happening next.

Testimonials

On the Leading Innovations Program, "I attended the meeting after having already been involved in several innovations around the development of new medical schools in 4 countries, sometimes at leadership level, and so was more experienced than some other attendees. However, I still found the meeting to be very useful. I was able to immerse myself for a week in other kinds of thinking and encouraged to consider how to translate concepts into medical education. The small group exercises allowed us to discuss the meaning of other models and theories and to merge, translate and develop potentially new ways of approaching familiar tasks. Group membership was deliberately diverse, so I was constantly having to think about things from the perspectives of different levels of experience and different health and education systems. For me the main benefit came in the weeks after the meeting, as I returned to my usual job but continued to reflect on the discussions during the meeting and thought throughways of applying what I had learned. I have since changed the way I work by increasing my focus on leading, rather than implementing, change."

Richard Hays, M.D., Dean, School of Medicine, Keele University, UK