Leaders, Educators, Innovators

The Harvard Macy Institute brings together health care professionals, educators, and leaders to discuss the critical challenges of the day and design innovative solutions that have a lasting impact on the way medicine is practiced and students are educated. Our goal is to foster transformative learning experiences that prepare the Harvard Macy scholars to lead institutional change as well as discover and harness new perspectives which may contribute to their professional growth.

The Institute grew out of recognition that leaders and innovators in health care education benefit from intensive collaboration with like-minded individuals. In our programs we strive to foster a collegial think tank atmosphere that provides scholars with not only an environment conducive to deep engagement with the challenges they face, but practical input from others to help address them. This attribute, more than any other, separates our programs from other continuing education offerings.

The Harvard Macy Institute was established in 1994 with a grant from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation. The Institute is a collaborative effort of Harvard Medical School, the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and Harvard Business School. Preeminent Harvard faculty members like Dr. Elizabeth Armstrong (HMS), Dr. Clayton Christensen (HBS), and Dr. Robert Kegan (HGSE) work with colleagues from leading institutions around the world to design and implement the programs. Many program alumni return to the Institute to serve as faculty.

 
 

Testimonials

On the Leading Innovations Program, "I attended the meeting after having already been involved in several innovations around the development of new medical schools in 4 countries, sometimes at leadership level, and so was more experienced than some other attendees. However, I still found the meeting to be very useful. I was able to immerse myself for a week in other kinds of thinking and encouraged to consider how to translate concepts into medical education. The small group exercises allowed us to discuss the meaning of other models and theories and to merge, translate and develop potentially new ways of approaching familiar tasks. Group membership was deliberately diverse, so I was constantly having to think about things from the perspectives of different levels of experience and different health and education systems. For me the main benefit came in the weeks after the meeting, as I returned to my usual job but continued to reflect on the discussions during the meeting and thought throughways of applying what I had learned. I have since changed the way I work by increasing my focus on leading, rather than implementing, change."

Richard Hays, M.D., Dean, School of Medicine, Keele University, UK

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